Privatisations to Stop in NSW


Labor will put an end to the Liberals’ destructive privatisation scam in NSW.

Under Labor the sell-offs will stop and there will be:

  • No privatisation of NSW hospitals;
  • No privatisation of Water;
  • No more electricity privatisation; and
  • No privatisation of public transport services.

These assets should remain in public hands and under Labor will be managed efficiently and effectively for the people of NSW.

Since 2011, the Liberals and Nationals have sold off more than $50 billion of publically-owned assets and have gone too far in their privatisation agenda.

This has not only led to the loss of dividend income that funds our teachers, nurses and paramedics – but has also had other devastating effects on the people of NSW.

Privatisation has resulted in higher electricity prices for families and small businesses, despite a pledge by former Premier Mike Baird before the last election that prices would not go up.  Prices have gone up by 20 per cent since 2017 and 60 per cent since 2011.

The privatisation of NSW’s ports has put a brake on the Hunter economy thanks to the secret clause the Government inserted into the contract that penalises an expansion of Newcastle Port’s container terminal. The privatisation of Newcastle’s buses has led to a reduction of services that has outraged commuters.

Privatisation of public assets will continue under the Liberals because that is in their DNA.  Labor’s commitment is that it will stop.

In the face of fierce opposition by the community and health workers the Liberals backed down on their plan to privatise regional hospitals in Maitland, Wyong, Goulburn, Shellharbour and Bowral, for now.

Privatisation has also resulted in price hikes for homeowners using the Land and Property Information Titling Registry which was sold off by the Berejiklian-Barilaro Government last year to pay for its $2.2 billion stadiums splurge.

If the Liberals are re-elected their privatisations will continue. Labor will put an end to these reckless and short-sighted sell-offs.